Monday, March 10, 2014

Unity


1.1
OM.  What follows are instructions on Unity

1.2
Unity obtains when the activities of the mind have ceased.

1.3
The witness then abides in its true nature

1.4
Otherwise, the witness is identified with the activities of mind and is just another thought-form itself.

1.5
There are five types of mind activity, both painful and pleasurable.

1.6
These are correct perception, misperception, imagination, dreamless sleep, and memory.

1.7
Correct perception may derive from direct observation, valid reasoning, or accurate testimony of enlightened teachers.

1.8
Misperception is knowledge based on the illusion of forms, rather than on the true nature of reality.

1.9
Imagination is mental images derived from words and concepts rather than objective observation and sensory perceptions.

1.10
Dreamless sleep is the state of mind when thought is absent and sensory perception is in abeyance.

1.11
Memory is the retention of thoughts and images generated by sensory perception and imagination.

1.12
Cessation of mind activity is achieved through the practice of yoga and the habit of dispassionate non-attachment.

1.13
Yoga practice is the willful effort to restrain the five activities of mind and abide in a state of stillness.

1.14
To be firmly grounded, this practice must be performed with earnestness and devotion over a long period of time, all the while holding the goal in clear and constant view.

1.15
Dispassionate non-attachment is the absence of desire for experiences of the senses – seen and unseen, here and hereafter.

1.16
Supreme dispassion is indifference to the three gunas of creation – light, inertia, and vibration – owing to a direct knowledge of Self.

1.17
Meditation for direct-knowing of the objective world is fourfold in nature: exterior observation, inner perception, alert stillness, and the sense “I am.”

1.18
The other state of meditation is when awareness perceives no thought or object – only the seeds of unmanifested possibilities.

1.19
This is the natural state of formless beings and those absorbed in True Nature.

1.20
Others can attain it through faith, earnestness, self-inquiry, clarity, and insight.

1.21
Those who proceed with unshakable intent can attain this state quickly.

1.22
Those who practice with varying degrees of effort – mild, moderate, intense – will progress in accordance with their efforts.

1.23
The other way to attain the natural state is through surrender to God.

1.24
God is the Supreme Being, formless, unbounded, limitless, untouched by action and desire.

1.25
The omniscience of God is infinite.  Man is but a germ of awareness.

1.26
God is timeless, the ever-present master of the ancient masters.

1.27
He is called by OM.

1.28
Silently repeat this world as a mantra while meditating upon its significance.

1.29
From this comes the disappearance of obstacles to the realization of Self.

1.30
The obstacles to Self-realization are disease, inertia, doubt, carelessness, procrastination, laziness, sense cravings, false perception, inability to concentrate, and inability to stabilize higher states when attained.

1.31
Encountering these obstacles one experiences grief, despair, physical agitation, and anxious breathing.

1.32
To overcome these obstacles the constant practice of a single truth is required.

1.33
The mind can be stilled by the earnest practice of openness, compassion, virtue, and indifference.

1.34
Or by breathing in and out, intentionally.

1.35
Intentional focus on any sense experience will enhance perception and still the mind.

1.36
Concentration upon the inner light beyond sorrow stills the mind.

1.37
Meditation upon a transcendent being stills the mind.

1.38
Inquiring into the experience of dreams and dreamless sleep stills the mind.

1.39
Fixing attention on that which is nearest the heart, also stills the mind.

1.40
The stilled mind of a yoga master realizes everything, from the infinitely small to the infinitely great.

1.41
As pure crystal takes on the adjacent colors, so does the mind free of thought become indistinguishable from that which it contemplates.  The perceiver, the experience of perceiving, and the object perceived are one.

1.42
When the mind projects names and concepts on what is seen through direct perception, confusion and delusion result.

1.43
When the mind is clear, empty of memories and knowledge, things are seen exactly as they are.

1.44
These same two conditions – projection and clarity – also apply to the perception of subtle, unmanifest realms.

1.45
The observation of progressively more subtle realms leads to the primal source.

1.46
These meditations have separate perceptions as the seed.

1.47
When there is no perception of separateness, the supreme Self reigns.

1.48
And absolute Truth is revealed as self-evident.

1.49
The direct experience of Truth is nothing like intellectual knowledge gained from scriptures and teachings.

1.50
The direct experience of Truth supersedes and destroys all previous impressions.

1.51
When the impression of a direct experience of Truth is also wiped out, there remains only Awareness without seed.